MENU
component-ddb-728x90-v1-01-desktop

As Holocaust knowledge drops, JCC looks to educate younger generations

The production is called "Survivors." A group of six actors and actresses tell the life stories of ten Holocaust survivors who all later moved to the Rochester area. (WHAM photo)

Brighton, N.Y. (13WHAM) - As holocaust survivors age, some fear their stories will be forgotten. A recent survey found many Americans, particularly younger Americans, aren't aware of many facts about the holocaust.

That also has some holocaust survivors, like Samuel Rind, afraid.

"One thing about history, it has a tendency of repeating itself," said Rind, who moved to Rochester in 1967.

Rind says he doesn't like telling the stories of his childhood, but that hasn't stopped him from visiting local schools and even writing a book to tell what happened.

"I do it because we have to make sure this is not forgotten," said Rind.

Rind is among those happy to see a new production headed by the Jewish Community Center's Department of Arts and Culture, aimed to help educate local students about the Holocaust.

The production is called "Survivors." A group of six actors and actresses tell the life stories of ten Holocaust survivors who all later moved to the Rochester area.

"What you’re getting is the heart and soul of these people and what they went through," said Ralph Meranto.

Meranto says the group is trying to hold shows in local schools to help educate younger generations, and make sure the stories of the Holocaust don't fade away.

More than 200 students attended its first show last week. The group is scheduled to perform in front of 300 students later this week.

Meranto says by putting faces to the stories, younger generations will likely be able to relate more to the stories of survival.

"What it has is a lot of heart and human experience, what the kids can walk away from after watching this show and truly understand what these people went through," said Meranto.




close video ad
Unmutetoggle ad audio on off

Trending