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Kodak helps develop odor-free fabric

Rochester, N.Y. - Imagine wearing the same shirt, days in a row and having it stay fresh.

Kodak has developed a new application for old technology making this a reality.

That old technology is silver salt. Kodak has been working with silver salt for over 130 years, primarily for photography for the light sensitivity of silver salt, said Kodak Chief Technology Officer Terry Taber.

In Kodaks Research Laboratories in Rochester, scientists figured out how to harness the properties in silver salt that inhibit the growth of microorganisms.

Working with PurThread Technologies out of North Carolina, Kodak was able to put the silver salt in fabric, in turn making odor-free clothes.

The fact that it's inhibiting odor, unless you get dirt or mud or something on it, it doesn't need to be washed as often to maintain its freshness, said Taber.

Kodak chemists, Gary Slater, worked on developing the technology and tested a t-shirt embedded with silver salt.

I was actually surprised how soft it was, said Slater. [I] wore it for about 2 weeks at home and it worked great, felt good never stunk for the whole time period.

Basically, what the silver is doing is that when heat, in this case body heat, and moisture are present it activates the silver so that any microbes that would really start to feed on any sweat it disrupts the metabolic process of the bacteria and shuts it down from multiplying, explained Taber.

Silver salt embed easily into synthetics.

Kodak and PurThread are working to embed them into other fabrics.

Taber said someday they hope to put them in hard surfaces.

 
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