ROC airport passengers to see minimal impact after Boeing jets grounded


    Rochester passengers flying out of the Greater Rochester International Airport won't see much of an impact because Southwest Airlines rarely uses the aircraft here. (WHAM photo)

    ROCHESTER, N.Y. (WHAM) - Boeing is scrambling to come up with a fix for its 737 Max Jet 8 and 9.

    The planes are now grounded in the United States due to safety concerns.

    The decision is based on new information on an Ethiopian Airlines crash on Sunday that killed more than 100 people.

    For one Rochester couple, the decision to ground flights is concerning, but isn't stopping their travel plans.

    Casey Baldwin and his wife, Amber, are going through with their plans to fly to Florida.

    "You know we are usually pretty trustful in the airline," said Casey Baldwin.

    They won't be flying in a Boeing 737 Max Jet 8 or 9.

    "It's always a risk flying, and I think you have to assume somewhat of a level of risk before going anywhere," Baldwin added.

    Rochester passengers flying out of the Greater Rochester International Airport won't see much of an impact because Southwest Airlines rarely uses the aircraft in Rochester.

    "In the last two months, it's only flown into Rochester 8 times of 239 flights," said Andy Moore, Airport Director.

    Decorated pilot Michael Canders said people shouldn't panic over the decision to ground the planes.

    He has more than 40 years of experience with aviation, and is the director of the Aviation Center at Farmingdale State College.

    "Without knowing the cause, there is no cause for alarm, I wouldn't hesitate to get on any aircraft even a 737 max," he said.

    He believes the short time span between two fatal crashes forced the grounding.

    Investigators are now trying to figure out if a problem with the computerized flight control system was to blame.

    "If the cockpit automation is doing something unexpected, it's very important that a pilot know how to fly the plane manually," Canders said.

    As an instructor, that's what he teaches his students, some of who go on to fly commercially.

    "We teach them that sometimes that auto pilot doesn't behave correctly and it's malfunctioning so we have to be able to disengage it," he said.

    Before flying, it's best if passengers check in with their airlines to see if the decision to ground these jets impacts their travel.

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